30 Days of Devition: 11 ~ Festivals, days, and times sacred to Eros

I’ve written a lot about the Feast of Eros, so go read that, if you haven’t, yet. This is set for 4 Thioyios of the New Boeotian calendar (sunset 3 April of the Gregorian calendar, this year).

Dr Susan Block has created “Eros Day“, and the date is selected for when the planetoid Eros, an asteroid belt object that has actually been studied to learn more about the origins of the solar system, is at its closest to Earth. This is usually 20 January, by the Gregorian calendar.

While i honestly have no personal problem with people deciding to honour Eros on St. Valentine’s Day, and I can certainly argue a folk-religion justification connecting Chaucer’s referencing to birds finding a mate in 14 February with the creation of birds by Eros (as per Aristophanes), but honestly, I haven’t started doing this just yet. This last eight years, i’ve actually actively abstained from honouring Eros on St. Valentine’s day simply because it’s been far too commercialised and just plain hokey, and not at all related to Eros as I know Him. Actually, mentioning the thing about the birds, I’m going to meditate on that and hopefully return to the topic of a festival honouring Eros’ position as the father of the birds, later.

I also honour Eros on the fourth-to-last day of the year, by the New Boeotian Calendar, as the anniversary of the date I bonded myself to Him in 2009. The date was chosen by Him, and I celebrate by soaking pieces of quince in wine, giving Him the first piece, and performing several divinations for guidance in the year to come –at least that’s the part of it I can talk about. This year, I plan on making quince preserves as a part of this ritual, at least a preparation for it, but it depends largely on finding good quince in-season.

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on Eros
  9. Common mistakes about Eros
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to Eros
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devition: 10 ~ Offerings – historical and UPG

Historical:
hare, cockerel/rooster, quince, apples, pears, myrtle,

Modern/ UPG:
roses, chololate, oxalis regnellii (purple shamrock/sorrel, “Love Plant”), vanilla, orchid, rose quartz, bivalve shells,

unknown:
cinnomon, copper, pearl, arrowheads, gold,

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on Eros
  9. Common mistakes about Eros
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devition: 9 ~ Common Mistakes about Eros

“Eros is all sweetness and love.” Eros is Love, Desire, even Longing, but Sweetness, He is not.

“Eros is a merry trickster.” I’ve learned one thing about deities with a trickster aspect from others who have a relationship with tricksters –tricksters are not merry and playful. Tricksters only look cute, and not all of Them.

“Eros is only about love and sex and escort directories and lube.” Er, no. No. I hope that if you’ve found this blog, you at least have a vague understanding of that.

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on Eros
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 8 ~ Variations on Eros

This has been one of the harder ones for me to answer, because while I know this can include “aspects” –and that can include the way that Waitress and Mother are both aspects of the character Christie on the sit-com Mom— I’ve clearly had people misunderstand what this blog is about and what I believe, and there is little that bothers me more than being misunderstood, having my words and ideas taken out of context, and twisted into something I nevef meant nor intended. This is something that has bothered me since I was a child, and I’ve actually gotten better about it in recent years (yes, I have –if you think I’ve been nasty to Halstead and others for twisting my words around in the last four or five years, trust me, you wouldn’t’ve known what to make of me when I was sixteen, twenty, twenty-four…).

No, I don’t believe that Cupid or Amor are Rome’s local forms of Eros. I don’t believe that Aegnus Og is the Irish form of Eros. And so on. I believe that they have common grounds, but these are as much the same deity as my humanoid meat-based housemate and I are the same person on the grounds that we split the rent.

I also have a very hard time accepting the notion of the putto, the “chubby winged baby”, as a valid form of Eros on anything more than historical grounds. I get that this became a dominant “form of Eros” later in antiquity, but it’s not one that I relate to at all, and is one I have never known.

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on Eros
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 7 ~ Names and epithets

Abros (ΑΒΡΟΣ) – tender
Algesidōros (ΑΛΓΕΣΙΔΩΡΟΣ) – pain inducer
Anikatos (ΑΝΙΚΑΤΟΣ) – irresistible
Bromios – (βρωμιωσ) “Thunderer”[2]
Diphuēs (ΔΙΦΥΗΣ) – dual in nature or form
Eleutherios (ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ) – the liberator
Kallistos (ΚΑΛΛΙΣΤΟΣ) – the fairest
Lusimelēs (ΛΥΣΙΜΕΛΗΣ) – limb-loosener
Phanes (Φανης) – Bring to Light
Protogenōs (ΠΡΟΤΟΓΕΝΩΣ) – First Born
Puridromos/Pyridromos (ΠΥΡΙΔΡΟΜΟΣ) – who runs on a path of fire
Skhetlios (ΣΧΕΤΛΙΟΣ) – cruel, merciless
Takeros (ΤΑΚΈΡΟΣ) – melting, languishing

Sappho also gave Him the epithets of “bittersweet”, “from heaven”, and “a crawling beast”.

His name in the Boeotian tongue, an Aeolic dialect, was Arpus. Some have also connected His name to the word Harpaleos, from the Homeric tongue of Aeolic, meaning “attractive,” and also “devouring”.

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 6 ~ Other related deities and entities associated with Eros

Lovers: Hyakinthos /Hymenaios, Ganymedes, Okeanid Rhodope

Erotes: Aphrodite, Anteros, Himeros, Hermaphroditos, Hedylogos, Pothos, Hymenaios,

Rivalries: Ares, Zeus, Apollon, Herakles

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with Eros
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 5 ~ Members of the family – genealogical connections

Mothers:
Khaos & Nyx, the latter born pregnant with Him after forming from the self-destruction of the former

Sisters:
The Moirai, Eris,

Half-Siblings:
Hypnos, Thanatos, Nemesis, Moros, the Keres, the Oneroi, Momos,

Wife:
Psykhe

Lovers:
Hymenaios/Hyakinthos, Ganymedes, Okeanid Rhodope

Offspring:
Hedone, birds, Poros, Penia

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of Eros
  4. A favorite myth or myths of Eros
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with this deity
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 4 ~ A favorite myth or myths of this deity

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 33. 4 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) :
“She [the Kharis Pasithea] found him [Eros] on the golden top of Olympos, shooting the nectar-drops from a cup [playing cottabus and game in which wine was thrown out of cups at a mark]. Beside him stood Hymenaios, his fair-haired playfellow in the dainty game. He had put up as a prize for the victor something clever made by his haughty mother [the Mousa] Ourania, who knew all the courses of the stars, a revolving globe like the speckled form of Argos; winged Eros had taken and put up a round golden necklace which belonged to his mother sea-born Aphrodite, a shining glorious work of art, as a prize of victory. A large silver basin stood for their game, and the shooting mark before them was a statue of Hebe shown in the middle pouring the wine. The umpire in the game was Ganymedes, cupbearer of Kronides [Zeus], holding the garland. Lots were cast for the shots of unmixed wine, with varied movements of the fingers [i.e. this was a finger game in which one quickly opens and closes some of his finger and the other has to say at once how many he had held out, used to determine who would go first] : these they held out, these they pressed upon the root of the hand closely joined together. A charming match it was between them.
Daintyhair Hymenaios drew the first try. He took the cup, and shot the flying nectar-drop high in the air over the basin; but he offered no prayer then to his mother the Mousa: darting from the cup the dew went scattering high through the air, but the leaping drops turned aside and swerved fell back about the face of the statue so as to touch the top of the head without a sound. Second, crafty Eros took hold of the lovely cup in a masterly way, and secretly in his heart prayed to Kyprogeneia [Aphrodite]; then with a steady eye on the mark, he shot the liquid into the distance–the dewy nectar went straight, unswerving, and curved round until it fell from the air upon the forehead above the temple with a loud plop. The elegant statue rang, and the basin echoed the sound of victory for the golden son of Kyprogeneia. Ganymedes laughing handed the dainty garland to Eros. Quickly he picked up the beautiful necklace and lifted the globe, and kept the two prizes of their cleverdrop game. Bold Eros went skipping and dancing for joy and turned a somersault, and tried often to pull his rival’s hands from his sorrowful face.
Now Aglaia stood by him, and she received the prizes from the hands of the prince of heart’s delight.”

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of this deity
  4. A favorite myth or myths of this deity
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with this deity
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 3 ~ Symbols and icons of this deity

Thespies1_evlahosArrows
Winged torso
Palm branch
Dove
Hare
Winged lion (Eros Areios, martial aspect)
Youth
Nebulae
Butterflies (Psykhe)
Crescent moon (Nyx, shield of Thespiai)
Orphic World Egg
Birds
Fish or dolphins (Ikthyes)
Flowers
Bivalve shell, lion’s paw, cockle (birth of Aphrodite)

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of this deity
  4. A favorite myth or myths of this deity
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with this deity
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.

30 Days of Devotion: 2 ~ How did I become first aware of Eros?

I first became aware of Eros’ mythology when i started reading Edith Hamilton when I was about nine or ten –very simple as that. No, a nun only gave me the D’Aulaire book a few years before, and i read Hamilton from the library after Sister Zoe planted that seed that germinated into a love for the Gods of Hellas. No big story about how I first became aware of Him through mythology.

Now, i became first aware of His presence in my life many years later, after I first really started diving into Hellenismos. Ive been in-transition from F to M about six years now (seven in June), so this would’ve been about eight or nine years ago now? Maybe a decade? Hard to tell, since i’ve been unsubscribed from all the e-mail lists after Yahoo purged my account for “inactivity” some time recently. I want to say it was within that first year, though.

Now, one of the reasons I got into Hellenismos as gung-ho as I did, right off the bat (like, to the point that, after the first two or three years on the email lists, I had annoyed Sannion so much that he was in temporary disbelief I’d only been around two or three years), is cos I had deities calling to me. I wouldn’t exactly compare it to like when your friend is bugging you to watch the new Transformers film, or when your three-year-old is tugging on your clothes. It wasn’t even necessarily a lot of symbolism all at once, in rapid and uncanny succession –though that did have a bit of a role. It was more like a brain-freeze, I suppose –I’d be in the middle of doing something, and then suddenly, I’d have this intense, almost dizzying-without-the-dizziness feeling (I have low blood sugar, so I know what random dizzy feelings feel like, and this was not that) and then feel absolutely compelled to start looking things up and reading about certain mythos or symbolism, etc…, almost like some entity or another just spun me around and pushed me into something something else, whether I liked it or not.

You ever see children running out in the store, and get the urge to grab onto the top of their head, and spin them in a different direction? Just me? Well, it was kind of like that.

I first concluded that Apollon was calling, and while it’s true that He was, and at first it seemed He was my loudest signal, that soon proved not the case. I checked out Hermes, then Dionysos, Pan, Athene…. Maybe another?

Then one night, I had this intense dream, which I detailed here, many moons ago. I want to say that was about a year after I started looking into all sorts of things and getting my signals figured out. A few days (weeks?) later, I had another dream that essentially confirmed Eros. That was what I call my “Divine Obvious-Stick Beat-Down” moment, cos in retrospect, even though all the details kind of run together, it seems like it should’ve been obvious far earlier than that.

  1. A basic introduction of Eros
  2. How did I become first aware of Eros?
  3. Symbols and icons of this deity
  4. A favorite myth or myths of this deity
  5. Members of the family – genealogical connections
  6. Other related deities and entities associated with this deity
  7. Names and epithets
  8. Variations on this deity (aspects, regional forms, etc.)
  9. Common mistakes about this deity
  10. Offerings – historical and UPG
  11. Festivals, days, and times sacred to this deity
  12. Places associated with this deity and their worship
  13. What modern cultural issues are closest to this deity’s heart?
  14. Has worship of this deity changed in modern times?
  15. Any mundane practices that are associated with this deity?
  16. How do you think this deity represents the values of their pantheon and cultural origins?
  17. How does this deity relate to other gods and other pantheons?
  18. How does this deity stand in terms of gender and sexuality? (historical and/or UPG)
  19. What quality or qualities of this god do you most admire? What quality or qualities of them do you find the most troubling?
  20. Art that reminds you of this deity
  21. Music that makes you think of this deity
  22. A quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think this deity resonates strongly with
  23. Your own composition – a piece of writing about or for this deity
  24. A time when this deity has helped you
  25. A time when this deity has refused to help
  26. How has your relationship with this deity changed over time?
  27. Worst misconception about this deity that you have encountered
  28. Something you wish you knew about this deity but don’t currently
  29. Any interesting or unusual UPG to share?
  30. Any suggestions for others just starting to learn about this deity?

About Ruadhán McElroy

Ruadhán has been a traditional Hellenic polytheist for about a decade, and has also maintained devotions to Eros and Apollon most of that time; his status as a devotee of Nyx is more recent. He also paints, makes music, makes jewellery, and writes novels set in the Mod Revival (UK) and Swampie (Oz) subcultures of the 1980s. He also gets a lot of odd little experiences that he jokes will forever render him an insufferable Goth.